World Tiger Day 2015

Celebrating #WorldTigerDay by showcasing a few other animals in the jungle that share space with the Mighty Royal Bengal Tiger! Along with the Royal Bengal Tiger, there are many species of animals, birds, reptiles and amphibians facing threats of extinction. #SaveTiger campaigns directly or indirectly benefit all the other species in the bio diversity with the Govt of India announcing Wildlife Sanctuaries as Tiger Reserves. Tiger Reserves have more protection and scrutiny as compared to any other sanctuary. This post is an initiative by Überspan Films and Pollachi Papyrus to showcase a few of the lesser known endangered species that need the same attention as the Tiger or any other endangered species that has a purpose in the bio diversity and cannot be replaced.

Listed as Endangered as the total number of mature individuals is less than 2,500 with no subpopulation having more than 250 mature individuals. There are estimates of a continued decline of over 20% of the populations in the next approximately 25 years, along with hunting and continued loss of habitat. Text from IUCN

Listed as Endangered as the total number of mature individuals is less than 2,500 with no subpopulation having more than 250 mature individuals. There are estimates of a continued decline of over 20% of the populations in the next approximately 25 years, along with hunting and continued loss of habitat. Text from IUCN

Listed as Endangered because its population size is estimated to number fewer than 2,500 mature individuals, there is an observed continuing decline in the number of mature individuals, and no subpopulation contains more than 250 mature individuals.

Listed as Endangered because its population size is estimated to number fewer than 2,500 mature individuals, there is an observed continuing decline in the number of mature individuals, and no subpopulation contains more than 250 mature individuals. Text from IUCN

Raorchestes jayarami also known as the Jayaram's Bush Frog is found in Valparai. It is a recently discovered species of frog and not much information is available at this point.

Raorchestes jayarami also known as the Jayaram’s Bush Frog is found in Valparai. It is a recently discovered species of frog and not much information is available at this point.

It is estimated that fewer than 2,500 mature individuals remain in the wild and the declining population trend is expected to continue. Main threats to the species include ongoing habitat loss, depletion of prey base, interspecific competition, persecution and possibly disease transfer from domestic and feral dogs. Text from IUCN.

It is estimated that fewer than 2,500 mature individuals remain in the wild and the declining population trend is expected to continue. Main threats to the species include ongoing habitat loss, depletion of prey base, interspecific competition, persecution and possibly disease transfer from domestic and feral dogs. Text from IUCN.

This species has a naturally very small and severely fragmented range, which is further declining rapidly as a result of conversion of forest habitats to plantations, agriculture and settlements. It therefore qualifies as Endangered.

This species has a naturally very small and severely fragmented range, which is further declining rapidly as a result of conversion of forest habitats to plantations, agriculture and settlements. It therefore qualifies as Endangered.

Listed as Vulnerable as the number of mature individuals is less than 10,000 (Molur et al. 2003) across many, severely fragmented locations, with continuing decline in habitat quality, area and with no subpopulation containing more than 1,000 mature individuals. Text from IUCN.

Listed as Vulnerable as the number of mature individuals is less than 10,000 (Molur et al. 2003) across many, severely fragmented locations, with continuing decline in habitat quality, area and with no subpopulation containing more than 1,000 mature individuals. Text from IUCN.

An initiative by Überspan Films and Pollachi Papyrus

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Telephoto Lens for Landscape Photography

Golden Misty Morning in Valparai | Landscape Photography with a Telephoto Lens

Shot with a Telephoto lens at 230mm focal length

Shot with a Telephoto lens at 230mm focal length

Budding photographers usually believe that only wide angle lenses should/can be used for landscape photography and telephoto lens are meant only for shooting mammals and birds. It is a highly misunderstood subject and people often get carried away when they see massive bazookas like the 500mm/ 600mm / 800mm prime lenses. It is always an advantage to have longer focal length lenses for photographing wildlife especially the ones that have a wide open aperture. While an f/4, 600mm lens will come in handy, you will have to shell out Rs. 7,00,000- 14,00,000 to possess one of these state of the art monsters. But what about the folks that cannot afford such expensive lenses? Can’t they produce beautiful images at all? Is it all a case of dream never come true?

Gold Clouds- Shot at 150mm focal length

Gold Clouds- Shot at 150mm focal length

Misty covering the tea plantation shot with a telephoto lens

Misty covering the tea plantation shot with a telephoto lens

No, one doesn’t need expensive gear to produce beautiful images. With the right amount of technical knowledge and understanding of the equipment, one can produce top quality image with just about any equipment. What did people do before the D4s’ and the 1Dxs’? Rules are for beginners until they understand the concept of photography. If y’all want to know how I use my Ultra-Wide Angle lens to shoot mammals, click on the link below.

https://harishvaravenkat.wordpress.com/…/mission-wide-angle/

Scorpion vs Ant

Mother! A Universal word! When it comes to protecting their young ones, they are fierce! Be it a tiny scorpion or a mighty elephant, they fend off their enemies with all their might.

Last year, while documenting the Geckos of Coimbatore, we came across an Indian Red Scorpion (Hottentotta tamulus) with young ones trying to fend off a persistent perpetrator, this time, an ant. After multiple attempts to snatch one of the baby scorpions, the ant couldn’t handle the wrath of the protective mother scorpion and had to beat hasty retreat.

Releasing this as the first video from my new venture Überspan Films

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